Bored with social media. Are we?

You bored with social media?In a time when we check Facebook when we’re bored, I recall a line from Harvey Danger’s smash hit, “Flagpole Sitta:” if you’re bored than you’re boring.

I’m not talking about you, Reider reader (punny). I’m talking about the social networks.

So have we really become bored with social media?

The Landscape

The article, Triumph of the bores, states that “no one can hear you being boring” on social media. That’s obvious when you realize that there are more than 500,000,000 tweets sent every day.

Today, people are overloaded with content, messaging and cat pictures. Are people experiencing information overload so severe that they’re cutting ties with their social networks?

In short, yes.

After reading the details below, it’s no wonder people are feeling the need to take breaks from social media.

The Facts

Is social media boring us?

Everyone may be on social media, but not everyone’s loving it.

Mobile discovery startup Delvv has created this infographic titled “Why you’re still bored,” which lists reasons, statistics and facts about why people are getting bored of social media.

Recent studies have revealed that six in 10 people dislike excessive sharing on social media. Other polls have suggested a smaller, yet growing sentiment among network users.

According to a new poll by Reuters and research firm Ipsos, 34 percent of surveyed Facebook users were suffering from “Facebook fatigue.” Because of this, they were spending less time on the website than six months ago. That’s a significant amount of “meh” surrounding the social network these days, and the malaise seems to be growing.

During Lent, a time when Christians “fast” from selected items, 31% of them shun technology … and some continue their refrain even after the 40 days.

The Aftermath

It’s hard to refrain from using social media, from having the world at our fingertips, to find useful information in nanoseconds, but the information overload is tuning out many users.

It’s concerning because Generation Y [holla!] often appears to have no patience for boredom. We’ve grown accustomed to multitasking on a plethora of screens (iPods, laptops, smartphones, Glass).

I contest, however, that taking a much-needed break from our technological distractions can give us a fresh look at the world around us. In a sense, we can “recharge” without the USB cable.

So stop staring at that screen and just eat your breakfast.

Share Your Thoughts

What do you think? Have your Facebook habits changed? Is “Facebook fatigue” a real thing?

About Carson Reider

Carson Reider is a research and content contributor for NR Media Group and a graduate assistant at the Center for Sports Administration at Ohio University. He is currently pursuing an MBA/MSA and also writes for the Ohio University Sports Administration website and OhioMarketingStudents.com.